Negotiation is a dialogue between two or more people or parties, intended to reach an understanding, resolve point of difference, or gain advantage in outcome of dialogue, to produce an agreement upon courses of action, to bargain for individual or collective advantage. Negotiation is intended to aim at compromise.
In November 2010, the graduating students of the MA Curating Contemporary Art course at the Royal College of Art, invited the artists Mariana Castillo Deball, Sean Dockray, Marysia Lewandowska and Wendelien van Oldenborgh to expose, appropriate and infiltrate the everyday apparatuses of power, governance and knowledge. 
Expounding the ways in which art can upset, interrupt or contest the all-encompassing power of the state – ‘in subtle as opposed to revolutionary ways’ - this is an intellectually stimulating exhibition which aims to affect our perceptions of familiar media and institutions. 
Most importantly, this detailed, analytical work solicits a visual and intellectual dialogue between the past and the present which, in turn, leads our gaze to the future. The desire to resist or to change, is not only an action or intervention, but a speculative vision of a future condition.
via Aesthetica Magazine

Negotiation is a dialogue between two or more people or parties, intended to reach an understanding, resolve point of difference, or gain advantage in outcome of dialogue, to produce an agreement upon courses of action, to bargain for individual or collective advantage. Negotiation is intended to aim at compromise.

In November 2010, the graduating students of the MA Curating Contemporary Art course at the Royal College of Art, invited the artists Mariana Castillo Deball, Sean Dockray, Marysia Lewandowska and Wendelien van Oldenborgh to expose, appropriate and infiltrate the everyday apparatuses of power, governance and knowledge. 

Expounding the ways in which art can upset, interrupt or contest the all-encompassing power of the state – ‘in subtle as opposed to revolutionary ways’ - this is an intellectually stimulating exhibition which aims to affect our perceptions of familiar media and institutions. 

Most importantly, this detailed, analytical work solicits a visual and intellectual dialogue between the past and the present which, in turn, leads our gaze to the future. The desire to resist or to change, is not only an action or intervention, but a speculative vision of a future condition.

via Aesthetica Magazine

Replies

Likes

  1. genwhyme posted this

 

Reblogs